Wednesday, August 24, 2016

Hurt

My feelings were hurt. I didn't say anything because I understood the other person's perspective of why they had "disappeared." The only person I mentioned it to was Joel. He's a great sounding board and agreed that this person probably needed some time to lick their wounds as I had been unable to help them. That's all fine but I was still hurt, annoyed, and even angry that instead of talking to me directly that I was temporarily cut out.

This morning I was pondering what I should do. Do I reach out to this person or wait until they reach out to me? Do I act as though nothing has happened or do I acknowledge it? What does this other person want? Do they want the help I can give or is all of that too late?

On my way to work I remembered the DR asking me "Do you always take care of other's emotions?" He said that even in the psych eval process I was trying to take care of his emotions, gauging my responses based on what I felt he could handle. I owned it, "Yes." We spoke about how I learned this as a child as a coping and survival method. I developed empathy so that I could manage the emotions of the people around me. It kept me safe(r).

At what point is managing other people's emotions damaging to my own? I'm hurt and frustrated. I know the other person is as well. Is it my responsibility to keep my feelings to myself as not to further injure the other? On the other hand, I can feel my frustrating building. As a parent, as a manager, as pastor, in whatever instances we have the opportunity to exercise "control" or "power-over" another person we must be aware so that we do not abuse our power. We must be responsible, but when do we get to say "That hurt me when you said X or did X?" Or is that never appropriate?

I've had plenty of parenting moments in which I told my girls "I may be the grown-up but I have feelings too and that hurt." Or am I teaching them my empathy for the wrong reasons? Am I teaching them to take care of others versus taking care of themselves?

No comments: